Text Size: AAA

Updates

The latest update on Phoenix, shows a large remaining backlog of cases. Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) provided the latest information on the public service pay system in a media teleconference on June 2.

“We are not surprised,” said Robyn Benson, PSAC National President. “It’s been almost 18 months since the government launched Phoenix and it feels like we are nowhere near the end of this mess.”

Large backlog of cases remains

According to the update, there are still 345,000 pay transactions in the system, which is about 265,000 more than they can process in any given month.

Due to a Phoenix pay system problem, members who ought to be in good standing have been rendered not in good standing because their dues have abruptly stopped (despite their continued employment). Unfortunately, it is impossible for Membership Administration to determine if dues have stopped due to a Phoenix glitch or if the member is on leave, retired, etc. 

Ontario passed legislation today that positions the province as a leader in fighting systemic racism and advancing racial equity for all.

The Anti-Racism Act, 2017 strengthens the government's commitment to identify and combat systemic racism in policies, programs and services and build a fair society where everyone is provided equal opportunity. 

Robyn Benson, National President of PSAC, has written to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, asking him to address the delay on the government’s part in signing four collective agreements.

“I believe that your promise to treat public servants with respect must be demonstrated beyond simple words,” said Benson in her letter to the Prime Minister. “I urge you to compel Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to set a fixed date for the signing of all the ratified agreements within the coming weeks.”

On May 31, 2017, Anishinabek Police Service (APS) officers who are represented by the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) voted down the employer’s final offer vote conducted by the Ministry of Labour over three days (May 29-31).

“We were surprised that the employer, instead of negotiating with us, went to the members with an offer that had even more cuts then what they had last agreed to at the bargaining table”, states Sharon DeSousa, PSAC Ontario Regional Executive Vice-President.

This summer, Canadians across the country will celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation. Publicly funded festivities will be held in every province and territory. Indigenous People of Turtle Island, however, will have quite a different perspective of this anniversary.

For most Indigenous People, Canada Day serves as a reminder of 150 years of colonialism, Indian Residential Schools, treaties not honoured, and the Indian Act. On June 21, National Aboriginal Day, let’s set the stage for a different narrative.

As a step in the continuing effort towards reconciliation, PSAC has partnered with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN). We have signed on as a major sponsor of National Aboriginal Day Live, where events are planned for eight cities: Halifax, Montréal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Yellowknife, Edmonton and Vancouver. These events will feature some of the biggest names in Indigenous music and television, including JUNO Award winners and on-the-rise artists. Talent from all genres, regions and nations, will be showcased, ensuring the recognition and inclusion of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

Pages